Pos and cons of weighted cars

Daniel

Daniel

Registered
8 Nov 2016
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Southampton
Looking for opinions if many g scalers weigh their cars for outdoor railroading to keep cars from derailing. For example, a 10” ESSO tank car weighs 1 lb 11 ozs. Recommended weight according to a g scale chart I referenced, is 2 lbs. 5 oz. l have read where pennies or nuts & bolts are placed over the axles to give the freight or passenger car added weight.
 
idlemarvel

idlemarvel

Neither idle nor a marvel
13 Jul 2015
2,013
239
Ascot
I think it depends. If you have tight curves (R1) or points then wagons might tip over due to sideways forces in the couplings. Or if you have sprung points then it would be necessary to have enough weight to move the spring. Usually just fitting metal wheels is enough, but if you can find somewhere to hide them nuts and bolts would be fine. Some people have used lead flashing (flat sheets of lead) which you can cut into shape with old scissors, if you can still get such stuff in the US.
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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I have found with LGB, Bachmann, Aristocraft and Piko stock this is not necessary. However if you get any of the Newquid (or sold by other names) cheepo stock it is most certainly advisable. However for mine I have found that Metal Wheels work just as well. In fact Metal Wheels work pretty well on all stock to help good running. I use LGB or Bachmann ones with equal measure.

if you find that Metal Wheels do not work I would look most carefully at where Trains come off, if the same location likely a joint or level is an issue.
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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Tamworth, Staffs.
Metal wheels are a good investment, but I find that sometimes a car (wagon) will wobble, in a most toy-like way.. :(
A little added weight can damp this down nicely.

PhilP
 
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JimmyB

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.
23 Feb 2018
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The only wagon I have added weight to is my track cleaning (attachment) wagon, not sure much just filled the underside with lead shot held in my 2-part resin.
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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8 Mar 2014
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If you run short trains your need for prototype weight is not usually a concern.
Sharper curves may need weight.
Longer trains, definitely.
I make sure my cars are all prototype unloaded weight, that is a good compromise. take the prototype unladen weight, and divide by the cube of your scale. Amazing how well this works.

Greg
 
Martino

Martino

Kit bashing, The UK narrow gauge, The GWR, Aviatio
I think it depends on the individual items of stock. I have a couple of Newquida coaches to which I have added metal wheels and also steel bars inside. I haven‘t subsequently had too many problems with these although every now and then they misbehave going through R7 crossovers. I think taking them at a prototype speed helps. All my stock has metal wheels and I agree that this helps a great deal. Some lighter items have been weighted and that appears to work well. One exception is an Accucraft W&L brake van. This has metal wheels and two large fishing weights slung low underneath. However, it still manages to come unstuck for no apparent reason at all sorts of places - points, curves, joints and just traveling along a straight! I think it’s haunted. It also has chopper couplings (all my stock has) which don’t work as well as they should.
Talking of stock wobbling in a toy like way, I watched an old video of Isle of Man trains recently and they seem to bounce, sway and wobble alarmingly. On that basis my locos and stock don’t behave at all like the prototype ;-)
 
Northsider

Northsider

Registered
3 May 2012
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63
I watched an old video of Isle of Man trains recently and they seem to bounce, sway and wobble alarmingly. On that basis my locos and stock don’t behave at all like the prototype ;-)
Manx stock wobbled because PW maintenance was pretty sketchy from WW2 onwards. Railtop ballast meant the sleepers rotted out of sight. When they relaid the entire South Line to Port Erin a few years back, many observed that it was just not the same!
 
D

Dan

Registered
28 Jan 2010
280
17
Eastern MA
For outdoor use I use solid brass axle sets bu USA Trains. Low center of gravity and minimal issues with the wind blowing the cars off the track. Indoors I prefer the LGB or trainli rim axle sets as they are lighter but heavier than plastic.
 
P

Paul M

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25 Oct 2016
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Royston
lead shot held in my 2-part resin.
I believe you need to be careful with lead, glue and plastic. Some have a chemical reaction and can melt your model if used together
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
25,025
1,096
Tamworth, Staffs.
I believe you need to be careful with lead, glue and plastic. Some have a chemical reaction and can melt your model if used together
Think it is lead-shot, PVA, and moisture?? - The PVA tends to hold moisture, and the lead 'furs-up', swelling, and causing distortion of the model..
 
JimmyB

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.
23 Feb 2018
2,543
497
Weston-super-Mare
Think it is lead-shot, PVA, and moisture?? - The PVA tends to hold moisture, and the lead 'furs-up', swelling, and causing distortion of the model..
Phil you are correct,the Gauge 0 Guild had a number of reported problems, where the PVA expanded so much brass boilers were buckled.
 
Hutch

Hutch

G Gauge, Raising Peaches, Apricots
1 Feb 2012
392
12
Southwest Oklahoma, USA
After we moved in 2005 I had trouble with derailing and unwanted decoupling on my indoor layout. It turned out that the slab floor must have laid by an inebriated sailor (I resembled that remark once or twice). After re-leveling the roadbed and replacing most of the 30+ year old twisted track, things are fine.

---Hutch
 
ARIA31

ARIA31

Registered
3 Oct 2017
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Toulouse - France
Another point of view might be the wear of wheel bearings.

I like to create loads for my rolling stock , and as I put weight on the cars I am concerned by this wear.
Accordingly I choose to get 150 g per axle as a guideline limit. (rougly 0.3 pound if I am right !)
That means 300 g for a 2 axles cars or 600 g for a 4 axles.

I would be interested to get other points of views on this guideline.
Is it too low ? What limit is considered by other railroaders ?
 
Last edited:
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Certainly the sort of curves on your line would have an effect, I would not have thought however that weight is required on your indoor line. As an aside might be worthwhile turning your stock around on occasion to even out any wear.
 
F

Fred Mills

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27 Mar 2017
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Ottawa/Nepean, Ontario Canada
There should be a minimum weight for all rolling stock, but; depending on weight to create good rolling qualities/trackage is not wise.
There must be good solid trackage, to start with. This means starting at the roadbed, then the track. Then the wheels must be compatable with the rails they run on.
This means maintain a strict standard of Gauge of track, and back-to-back spacing of wheels.
….then we can start looking at weight...
Start by converting to metal wheels, thus putting weight in the lowest position.
Realizing that the true dynamics of rail on wheel is NOT improved by having wheels independently mounted on an axle..., and that the sharper the points and curves, the more prone to derailments your railway equipment will be; adding higher speeds will doom everything to constant derailments.
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

Registered
8 Mar 2014
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San Diego
www.elmassian.com
the weight is normally very reliant on the length of the car, again I stress that prototype unladen weight works very well, unless you are in a competition to pull way more than the real loco ever did.

Greg
 
Hutch

Hutch

G Gauge, Raising Peaches, Apricots
1 Feb 2012
392
12
Southwest Oklahoma, USA
Another point of view might be the wear of wheel bearings.

I like to create loads for my rolling stock , and as I put weight on the cars I am concerned by this wear.
Accordingly I choose to get 150 g per axle as a guideline limit. (rougly 0.3 pound if I am right !)
That means 300 g for a 2 axles cars or 600 g for a 4 axles.

I would be interested to get other points of views on this guideline.
Is it too low ? What limit is considered by other railroaders ?
I use a MAXIMUM of 2 lbs. (1 kg) per U.S. 4 axle freight car.
This is an impracticable load to put in a steam tender if you have electronics or sound installed.
So, obviously I don't reverse my freight cars much on a steam train.
For U.S. 4 axle passenger cars I only use 1 pound, or 1/2 kg per car.

This is indoors on R1 and R2 track with a few evil S-Curves.

---Hutch
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
26,704
1,075
North West Norfolk
I believe you need to be careful with lead, glue and plastic. Some have a chemical reaction and can melt your model if used together
Resin is OK :nod::nod::nod::nod:

PVA is a no-no because it reacts with the lead and expands :sweating: