LGB DCC Onboard Decoders - Programming Tip

LGB333

LGB333

Active Member
I just completed programming some CVs on my newly purchased LGB 22892 DC/DCC Sound Sumpter Valley Articulated Mallet. Historically, the Sumpter Valley Railroad bought both the #50 and #51 mallets from the Uintah Railway in late 1930s, reconfigured them by removing the loco water tanks, and then operated them with tenders attached. This LGB Sumpter Valley model uses the basic design of their LGB Uintah loco, both produced by the original LGB (Ernst Paul Lehmann Patentwerk) in the early 2000 timeframe with an onboard DCC decoder technology built into the main circuit board by Massoth - Germany.

Today I was frustrated trying to program three CVs (CVs 1, 52, and 54) when I received the "check mark" on my Massoth Navigator Wireless Controller which means the CV was successfully changed.......but the loco didn't "jump" back and forth as normal when I pushed the OK button. So I Read the CV, it still had the original CV value........didn't work. I tried it a second time, same result. Frustration! I finally was able to change the CV1 address, but not the normal approach. But the next two CVs, a no go after trying several times.

So, then I remembered the process recommended by Soundtraxx for their Tsunami2 decoders........de-power and re-power the locomotive/decoder after pushing the OK button. So, I unplugged my Piko Central Station that powers my programming track, and re-plugged it. Tried programming the errant CVs again, and bingo, it worked! So, if you have a problem trying to program one of these older LGB locos with the onboard DCC decoders designed into the main circuit board, de-power and re-power the loco/decoder, and try again. This is especially true if using a non-Massoth DCC system. In fact, I had problems using my Massoth DCC system two years ago trying to program CVs with Soundtraxx Tsunami2 sound decoders until I watched one of their help videos and saw the techie raise one side up of the loco he was programming.......he did it immediately after each CV setting. I tried it and bingo, it worked!

Tom
 
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dunnyrail

dunnyrail

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I have a switchable Programming Track so Switch to Off should do the trick.
 
PhilP

PhilP

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Sometimes it is the Central Station, rather than the Decoder, that needs a reset.. The big switch, and start again. :nerd::)
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

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25 Oct 2009
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Sometimes it is the Central Station, rather than the Decoder, that needs a reset.. The big switch, and start again. :nerd::)
Just like Windows.
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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Wow, that is wild.... so what are they really saying?

That the programming track, while electrically isolated, receives interference from the rest of the layout?

When you are in programming mode (NMRA service mode), doesn't the Piko command station stop all other activity on the main?

Something is fishy.

Greg
 
John S

John S

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Exeter, Devon, UK
Nothing fishy about it. The PIKO unit ONLY has one output, it is shared to accommodate both tasks, hence the note from the manual.
 
PhilP

PhilP

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5 Jun 2013
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Nothing fishy about it. The PIKO unit ONLY has one output, it is shared to accommodate both tasks, hence the note from the manual.
:devil::devil::devil:
A 'Newbie' disaster, waiting to happen.. :rolleyes:
:devil::devil::devil:
 
idlemarvel

idlemarvel

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Yes you really need a DPDT switch from the output so you are connected to the main track or programming track but not both. It's a bit cheapskate of PIKO not to provide two electrically isolated outputs. The cheaper Hornby central station (Select) has the same issue, but at least they show a DPDT switch (not supplied) in their documentation. Their more expensive Elite model has a separate programming output.
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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John S, the "fishy" part is why would you need to do an estop when using the programming track (mode)

The explanation given is that other locos can cause interference

How can that be if you only have one loco electrically connected to the programming track?

Does not make sense as written by the manufacturer from your quote.


Greg
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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Could it be a bad translation?
Perhaps, they mean 'do not run other trains' whilst trying to program??

But, especially for someone starting out, I would say:
Separate programming track, or if only one output from CS, then a BIG switch, to disconnect all but one section of track, and have the loco on that section..
 
John S

John S

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Exeter, Devon, UK
As stated PIKO unit has only one Track Output, the Central Station is able to perform both the task of running trains and programming.

To do, as previously mentioned a DPDT switch will provide a connection to either the "Main" or Program Track, in Programming Mode (service or whatever the NMRA speak is these days), the action of pushing down the Emergency Stop Button ensures the accuracy and ability to carry out the programming procedure on the designated programming track, as opposed to interfering or accidentally altering anything when using the "Main" for programming.
 
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Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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I'm actually trying to understand this, believe me.

I cannot understand why you would NEED to press emergency stop. Don't you put the system into "service mode" as separate from programming on the main, normal running?

I'm completely understanding that you could enter service mode with multiple locos on the track, a mistake of course, but other than stopping all the locos on the track that is currently hooked to the output, I cannot see how it helps "accuracy and ability to carry out programming" .....

If he mistakenly leaves multiple locos/decoders connected when entering service mode, he still has an issue, emergency stop or not.

If there is only only one loco/decoder connected to the command station output, he does not have an issue, emergency stop or not.

Pressing Emergency Stop before service mode programming does not make sense, UNLESS it is REQUIRED before entering service mode... This is what I am trying to understand, is this a quirk of the system?

Greg