Laying track

P

Paradise

Registered
28 Jan 2010
994
The use of 'aye' is mostly prevalent above the Tropic of Capricorn it is not used much by the southerners, another one was the use of "but" at the end of a sentence common in the Newcastle area.
I reckon you're right about that, aye! ;)
 
P

Paradise

Registered
28 Jan 2010
994
Or Thongs vs Jandals and thong means something totally different in the US.
Flip-flops too. Sounds more like it's about property investment. :giggle:
 
David1226

David1226

Registered
24 Oct 2009
4,488
70
Abingdon, Oxfordshire
I think I have mentioned before, the family of our New Zealand Daughter-in Law's sister, who have lived in the Newcastle area of the UK for many years, from a time when the two son's, now in their twenties, were quite small. It always amuses me, when we get together to hear Mum and Dad, still with a noticeable New Zealand accent, and the two sons who are broad Geordie.

David
 
A

adverse camber

Registered
2 Dec 2009
217
East Anglia
This looks excellent and will work well I am sure,.....till you decide you want to move it or modify it when you will breaking up concrete (I know I have been there).

I now use something called grano in the UK which is basically 5mm to dust granite chippings (quite like chicken grit but with more dust). This locks together just like real ballast allows for some track expansion and movement and can be easily topped up and modified. It is laid on a polyethene sheet to keep the weeds out. The main down side is it needs to be wider than the system used here and needs topping up annually, but is very quick to lay down (dig the trench put done the polyethene fill with grano tamp down and lay the track. I am now on my 5th ton of grano (over a decade).