Laying track

tgood

tgood

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See photos of the track I've got laid between the rain. I used 2 inch rigid ins and 4 inches of fine crushed concrete the final top, 1 inch, layer will be poultry grit. Also you'll noticed the custom ash shovel I made. Cheap but works. I used stucco lath for the reinforcement.
 

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I've seen warnings on some trains saying to keep them away from sand. I hope this kind of set up wouldn't pose a problem.
 
Gavin Sowry

Gavin Sowry

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So why the cardboard walls? just to contain the ballast while installing?

How does the metal mesh reinforce? I'm not quite getting it.

Thanks, Greg
Yeah, I'm just as curious as Greg is. And, is it just a camera trick, or is that superelevation on the curve for real?
 
tgood

tgood

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So why the cardboard walls? just to contain the ballast while installing?

How does the metal mesh reinforce? I'm not quite getting it.

Thanks, Greg
Works the same as reinforcing bars in larger concrete jobs. The stucco lath is what's used to hold the stucco to the walls of a building.
Yeah, I'm just as curious as Greg is. And, is it just a camera trick, or is that superelevation on the curve for real?
Yeah, I'm just as curious as Greg is. And, is it just a camera trick, or is that superelevation on the curve for real?
The curve is pitched according to the scale of the real thing so yes it is pitched and I have tested it out and it performs perfectly. Had a retired UPRR road supervisor set it up for me by making a templet for the curves. I'll provide a picture of a coach on the curve.
And....yes your right the cardboard is just to hold the ballast and the soil in place after its wet it just tears off at ground level.
 
tgood

tgood

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I've seen warnings on some trains saying to keep them away from sand. I hope this kind of set up wouldn't pose a problem.
There isn't any loose sand involved with the ballast. The poultry grit is dry mixed with Portland and brushed into place and a spray bottle is used to set up the Portland. Works much better than using tile bond glue.
 
tgood

tgood

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I forgot to add that the curve joints are all soldered with tin and not lead. The straight sections are only fastened with the fishplates and pinched with a pair of needle nosed pliers. This seems to work well in Nebraska and the garden is a raised bed with excellent drainage.
 
Gavin Sowry

Gavin Sowry

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That's going to look swell when finished. The straights (or tangents in your language) look straight, and the transitions look super good.
 
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Paul M

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Looks fantastic
 
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Paradise

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That's going to look swell when finished. The straights (or tangents in your language) look straight, and the transitions look super good.
I think the last time I heard the word 'swell' used like that was by Bobby Brady. :)
 
Gavin Sowry

Gavin Sowry

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I think the last time I heard the word 'swell' used like that was by Bobby Brady. :)
I find it a common courtesy to speak to someone in their own language...... I am fluent in many forms of English.
 
GAP

GAP

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I find it a common courtesy to speak to someone in their own language...... I am fluent in many forms of English.
Living in Australia requires a person to speak 6 different forms of English depending on which state they are in, that does not include ex servicemen who are also required to speak a further 3, Army, Navy & Air Force. Having worked with foreign service people and on equipment I am also fluent with another 2 forms, US & UK service speak.
And English has been described as a "Universal language". :(

Now its back to your normal program.
 
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Paradise

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I find it a common courtesy to speak to someone in their own language...... I am fluent in many forms of English.
It was very common in the 40's and 50's. It's not such a common term 'now a days'.
I'm more of a 'bonza' kind of guy. Now where did I leave my blue suede shoes? :)
 
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Paradise

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Living in Australia requires a person to speak 6 different forms of English depending on which state they are in, that does not include ex servicemen who are also required to speak a further 3, Army, Navy & Air Force. Having worked with foreign service people and on equipment I am also fluent with another 2 forms, US & UK service speak.
And English has been described as a "Universal language". :(

Now its back to your normal program.
Yeah, Queenslanders tend to add 'aye' to the end of every sentence as a form confirmation. It instantly turns a statement into a question and drives me nuts. :think:
'I got really pissed last night and now feel crook as a dog, aye! Some greasy maccas will fix me up, aye!'
 
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Gavin Sowry

Gavin Sowry

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Living in Australia requires a person to speak 6 different forms of English depending on which state they are in...
Not to mention, of course, 6 different names for the same size beer.
 
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Paul M

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Well in Britain, where English was born, no-one seems to speak the same dialect, and that's on a speck of an island. Having spent years working on build sites, I still get stumpedvby a Geordie in full flow!
 
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Paradise

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I've noticed a huge increase of the use of such non words as 'sumfink' and 'nuffink' from a certain generation. Even by otherwise well spoken professionals. :confused:
 
GAP

GAP

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Yeah, Queenslanders tend to add 'aye' to the end of every sentence as a form confirmation. It instantly turns a statement into a question and drives me nuts. :think:
'I got really pissed last night and now feel crook as a dog, aye! Some greasy maccas will fix me up, aye!'
The use of 'aye' is mostly prevalent above the Tropic of Capricorn it is not used much by the southerners, another one was the use of "but" at the end of a sentence common in the Newcastle area.