It started with a shed.....

Hal Farsed

D.P. Gumby.
7 Apr 2014
613
662
Staffordshire, England.
Sorry to go on about this but there are a few more things to think about with your shed.

You need to add some guttering, otherwise water runs down the roof, falls onto the floor and splashes up against the wood, and is the major cause of rot. Add some water butts and you can collect the water for watering the garden.
Added at rear of shed, front in progress!

Your shed is very close to the ground and one one side has grass growing up the side. This will exacerbate the problem above. Too late to raise it up as dunnyrail dunnyrail dunnyrail dunnyrail suggests, but I would dig out a narrow trench on the grass side and fill it with loose gravel, this will reduce the splash up and improve the drainage. I assume the rest of the shed is on slabs and the timber on the ground is pressure treated or similarly protected.
Shed is stood on timbers on the slabs, Trench for stone as you described in hand. Timber pressure treated will be coated with Barrettine protective treatment this summer.

You have lots of windows which I would double glaze. Assuming they are glass not perspex it is easy to get the panes double glazed, you only need 4mm gap or so and it makes all the difference. No condensation on the inside of the windows.
(Glass) windows: there is no condensation.

Your artificial lighting looks a bit sparse. Even with those windows you still need good artificial light. There was a good thread on here fairly recently about this, long LED strips same size as the old style florescent tubes seems to be the best answer.
Agreed. Centre two lamps will be replaced this summer. I thought I could get aways with LED equiv 60W lamps.

I would paint the shed in something like Dulux Weathershield. It will last 5-10 years and even though it is water soluble paint forms a waterproof layer which repels water very effectively.
See above.

Keeping your shed warm and dry is very important, not just for your comfort but because otherwise cold sheds and moist air create damp which will infiltrate into wood, card, and any absorbent materials, causing mould and rot, and ruining your modelling work.
I believe you are partly right. However to accomplish the conditions you describe. I would need to spend considerably more on the shed its self, so it is more like a home office. At the end of the day, it is now dry, Locomotives will not be stored in this shed. Any buildings within the shed will be built with the same specification as any outside. I believe also that the number of days it will be too cold to use the shed will be minimal.

It is worth the extra time and expense, you will hopefully be retired a long time so a few weeks wait before you get stuck into your hobby will not matter in the long run. I don't want to dampen (hah!) your enthusiasm but I have been here myself.
I thank you for taking the trouble to write this, I have taken several points on board. The shed is dry and airy, and I think it is important to ensure a good circulation of air. by not filling it up with "stuff" read junk.
 
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idlemarvel

Neither idle nor a marvel
13 Jul 2015
2,586
724
Ascot
Sorry to go on about this but there are a few more things to think about with your shed.

You need to add some guttering, otherwise water runs down the roof, falls onto the floor and splashes up against the wood, and is the major cause of rot. Add some water butts and you can collect the water for watering the garden.
Added at rear of shed, front in progress!

Your shed is very close to the ground and one one side has grass growing up the side. This will exacerbate the problem above. Too late to raise it up as dunnyrail dunnyrail dunnyrail dunnyrail suggests, but I would dig out a narrow trench on the grass side and fill it with loose gravel, this will reduce the splash up and improve the drainage. I assume the rest of the shed is on slabs and the timber on the ground is pressure treated or similarly protected.
Shed is stood on timbers on the slabs, Trench for stone as you described in hand. Timber pressure treated will be coated with Barrettine protective treatment this summer.

You have lots of windows which I would double glaze. Assuming they are glass not perspex it is easy to get the panes double glazed, you only need 4mm gap or so and it makes all the difference. No condensation on the inside of the windows.
(Glass) windows: there is no condensation.

Your artificial lighting looks a bit sparse. Even with those windows you still need good artificial light. There was a good thread on here fairly recently about this, long LED strips same size as the old style florescent tubes seems to be the best answer.
Agreed. Centre two lamps will be replaced this summer. I thought I could get aways with LED equiv 60W lamps.

I would paint the shed in something like Dulux Weathershield. It will last 5-10 years and even though it is water soluble paint forms a waterproof layer which repels water very effectively.
See above.

Keeping your shed warm and dry is very important, not just for your comfort but because otherwise cold sheds and moist air create damp which will infiltrate into wood, card, and any absorbent materials, causing mould and rot, and ruining your modelling work.
I believe you are partly right. However to accomplish the conditions you describe. I would need to spend considerably more on the shed its self, so it is more like a home office. At the end of the day, it is now dry, Locomotives will not be stored in this shed. Any buildings within the shed will be built with the same specification as any outside. I believe also that the number of days it will be too cold to use the shed will be minimal.

It is worth the extra time and expense, you will hopefully be retired a long time so a few weeks wait before you get stuck into your hobby will not matter in the long run. I don't want to dampen (hah!) your enthusiasm but I have been here myself.
I thank you for taking the trouble to write this, I have taken several points on board. The shed is dry and airy, and I think it is important to ensure a good circulation of air. by not filling it up with "stuff" read junk.
Sounds like you have it all in hand. Enjoy your shed! :)
 

Hal Farsed

D.P. Gumby.
7 Apr 2014
613
662
Staffordshire, England.
Oh I'm really not sure about this. Perhaps when a lot of it is covered up with low relief buildings and trees and stuff.

(and the joins are blended better!)



162053912_443904606719221_1970006739501880167_n.jpg
 
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Chris Vernell

Certified
24 Oct 2009
6,255
1,320
74
Nepean, ON
Oh I'm really not sure about this. Perhaps when a lot of it is covered up with low relief buildings and trees and stuff.

(and the joins are blended better!)



View attachment 282483
Can you use a flexible backboard and curve the corner?
Myself, I'd simply ignore the corner. I can turn a blind eye as well as Admiral Nelson ever did ;)
 

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
19,632
3,925
72
St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Oh I'm really not sure about this. Perhaps when a lot of it is covered up with low relief buildings and trees and stuff.

(and the joins are blended better!)



View attachment 282483
Absolutely a building in the corner looses a multitude of sins and in fact takes your eye off the edge. Another good dodge would be to paint a door in that building red, you will be surprised how that catches the eye.
 

Chris Vernell

Certified
24 Oct 2009
6,255
1,320
74
Nepean, ON
Absolutely a building in the corner looses a multitude of sins and in fact takes your eye off the edge. Another good dodge would be to paint a door in that building red, you will be surprised how that catches the eye.
Especially if there's a red light over the door ...
 
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Jasper

Hey, I'm only being creative here.
11 Mar 2017
328
48
53
The Netherlands
Another good dodge would be to paint a door in that building red, you will be surprised how that catches the eye.
I suddenly realize I was waiting for this tip. I'll try it soon. Thank you!