GNR Coaches Suitable for Stirling Single Locomotive

peterbunce

1880's Colorado Narrow gauge on 45mm track
29 Oct 2009
1,754
16
east of manchester
Hi,

GNR coaches have a semi elliptical roof, and square panels made by strips over the teak body.

Alas the Bachmann coaches are nothing like the GNR or the ECJS coaches; I have some drawings and the book on ECKS stoch which is the long distance carriages for such services as London - Edinburgh. The IP coaches though much shorter are to the 'tradititional' UK carriage design, and are in design very like North Eastern Railway coaches to which the GNR connected at York, they are maroon in colour after an early two colour livery.

A photo of an NER clerestory bogie coach and a 4 wheel one as well is at

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-XwyPdpqar_k/UEOcnwo_VuI/AAAAAAAAE7c/UqgdPMb-Po4/s1600/020920121050b.jpg < Link To http://2.bp.blogspot.com/...1600/020920121050b.jpg


The Bogie Clerestory has a very faded/weathered colour! The NER had 6 wheel designs as well, though bogie coaches may be better as making 6 wheel chassis are a bit difficult, to get to run well, especially on our necessarily sharp curves.


There are two GNR coaches in the collection of the Vintage Carriages Trust at the following link for a list of their vehicles -

http://www.vintagecarriagestrust.org/Collection.htm < Link To http://www.vintagecarriag.trust.org/Collection.htm

From that you can 'click on' the links to a photo.

The roof colour could also be a light red oxide.


For a really first class vehicle the Bluebell railway have the GNR Directors Saloon, which is a clerestory that can be seen at

http://www.bluebell-railway.co.uk/bluebell/gnr_saloon.html < Link To http://www.bluebell-railw...uebell/gnr_saloon.html

That is a start.

Yours Peter
 

Waldgrun

Registered
25 Oct 2009
209
0
Yr Ystog Powys
Ted,
The I.P. coach kits seem to be based on vehicles from two welsh Narrow gauge lines, namely the Festiniog and the Talyllyn
2ft and 2ft 3 inch guage. So might look a bit odd behind a standard guage model. As some would say on this forum Rule 8 applies!
 

Zerogee

Clencher's Bogleman
25 Oct 2009
17,124
1,689
North Essex
Hi Ted, and welcome to this particular little madhouse that is GSC..... :D

Quoting directly from Mike's sig line, here is the "official" definition of this forum's Rule 8:

"RULE *8*
The most important rule...........
ITS MY RAILWAY, I WILL RUN WHAT I WANT, WHEN I WANT, HOW I WANT, AND IF YOU DONT LIKE IT..........
BUGGER OFF!"

In other words, anybody with a peculiar nasal whine to their voice (who might or might not be wearing an anorak) should not criticise anyone else's choice of how (and with what) they run their own line - lest they be told where they can shove their rivets after they've finished counting them.

Rather like the Pythons' Australian Philosophy Department (Rule 6: "There is NO rule 6..."), I don't think there are any rules 1 to 7 - at least, I've never seen them! ;)

Most of us don't take things too seriously, as you may have guessed by now. I think you'll fit right in. :D

Jon.
 

peterbunce

1880's Colorado Narrow gauge on 45mm track
29 Oct 2009
1,754
16
east of manchester
hi Ted, the primary think wrong, for your purposes, with IP (Narrow Gauge) coaches is that they are jus that narrow in width.

Emily in real life would have been a wider loco than a narrow gauge one, the coaches are the same. The IP ones are about 7 feet wide, the GNR 6 wheel coaches are 7.5 feet or a bit more, and the 6 wheelers are longer as well, later they would have been 8 foot wide: bogie (compartment, not corridor )stock . Add a corridor andf they could be up to 9 foot wide in C.1900 and later.

A generic 6 wheel coach, for standard gauge (1:29 or 1:32 if all depends on what scale Emily is, and she is really a standard gauge loco) would have 4 compartments + a luggage/guards section with 4 compartments or just compartments would have 5 compartments. Bogie are longer and have more.

Our elastic scale allows for such variations; IF you modeled standard gauge to the same ratio the track gauge is in excess of 70mm - which is far too much! Hence the elastic gauge, to assist us , here is a chart link from myLargescale.com

http://www.mylargescale.com/1stclass/garyArmitstead/Large-scale-scales2.gif < Link To http://www.mylargescale.c...arge-scale-scales2.gif

That shows American rolling stock: allowances need to be made for the much smaller (pre 1910) British clearances; say 13 feet high, and 8 feet wide for a informed guess, that should help.

GNR coaches were very distinctive and the Bachmann ones recently on sale are not like them at all the panelling is wrong. The Bachmann ones are to a basic traditional or generic design - very like the IP, or Branbright freelance coach design, which as above are narrower. The exception is the Ffestiniog Railway some of their rolling stock is very wide for narrow gauge.

Yours Peter
 

Zerogee

Clencher's Bogleman
25 Oct 2009
17,124
1,689
North Essex
Thanks Neil, I stand corrected - I hadn't noticed that before! Mind you, I think it needs a little updating to change "G Scale Mad" (RIP) to "G Scale Central"....

OK - so unlike the Philosophy Department of the University of Wallamalloo, we DO have a Rule 6 - and our Rules 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 are slightly less politically incorrect as well. ;)

Jon.
 

royale

G scale and driving my Royale Sabre kit car
26 Oct 2009
1,569
51
Long Eaton
Best of luck with your plans,Ted - I'll be very interested to see what you come up with.

John from near Nottingham and not too far from Sherwood!