Does anyone recognize this Locomotive?

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Paradise

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28 Jan 2010
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That's just double plus awesome good Scot. I love it! :clap:
Now, you would think they would have a doorway from the passenger through to the locomotive section for when the commissioner wanted a hot cup of tea. :happy:
 
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Paradise

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Now back on track with the original post.
So what is with the layout of the locomotive?
Is it to give the driver a better view of the front for yard work while having a larger boiler with the fireman working from the tender? :think:
It's a long walk to the other side though...
 
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Paul M

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25 Oct 2016
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Now back on track with the original post.
So what is with the layout of the locomotive?
Is it to give the driver a better view of the front for yard work while having a larger boiler with the fireman working from the tender? :think:
It's a long walk to the other side though...
Wasn't it due to it being driven through the groundsmans' shed?
 
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Paul M

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Ah! Seeing that, it makes so much more sense.. - I see a 'bulkhead' between the footplate and passenger sections..
BUT.......
Where did they put the fuel? :think:
The fuel was probably piled in the corner of the cab, it may not have actually used a lot, and if there was frequent stops, there was probably a stock at the stations
 
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Tas devil

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7 Oct 2015
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Hi Phil,
what makes more sense? im not sure you are refeering to there..

As for the fuel, for my freelance Ruby 'bash, I have honestly never once considered that question! :eek:
the model has a gas tank..but if it was a real prototype locomotive, where would the fuel go? huh..dont know.
In the 17 years this model has existed, you are the first to ask! ;)

Here is the prototype locomotive that the cab was based on:

View attachment 256116

She was named "Emilia" and was built for the Chimbote Railway of Mexico..
Built by Baldwin in 1868.
Little is known about her, other than the surviving builders photo.
There must have just been a small bunker for coal inside the cab..
interesting question though!

Scot
It may have been wood-fired, with a liitle woodstack on one side of the cab area.
But that’s just a guess.
 
Fred2179G

Fred2179G

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20 Apr 2017
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Now back on track with the original post.
So what is with the layout of the locomotive?
Is it to give the driver a better view of the front for yard work while having a larger boiler with the fireman working from the tender? :think:
It's a long walk to the other side though...
Buffalo is a very cold place in winter. Snow up to 20 ft high at times. If that's the back of the boiler (i.e. the firebox) at the rear of the footplate, then this is a "camelback". They were originally made with the cab forward of the firebox as the firebox was huge. (google NJ or Lackawanna camelback.) It made the cab quite cozy in winter! No idea (other than warmth) why this one had to have the cab so far forward.
 
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Paradise

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Camelback locomotives burned Anthracite coal and required a much large grate area which is why they had a firebox as wide as the locomotive itself necessitating a higher cab for visibility.
Perhaps it was a anthracite burner but I'm not totally convinced but it could be. Slower burning coal being so hard, more efficient, cleaner burning and was cheaper back then. :think:
Shunters need visibility. That could be why the cab is so forward. Some locomotives had extended buffers for that reason.
 
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